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We Read it for the Articles

This post originally appeared on The Playboy Project. We read it for the articles. Really. The old tongue-in-cheek justification for reading Playboy magazine genuinely applies here. What began with an informal conversation between myself and Interim Manager of Methodist Library & Special Collections, Candace Reilly, about the preponderance of advertisements for radar detectors in issues from the […]

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Circus a la King

This post originally appeared on the Critical Studies in Television blog. Good true crime is like an onion: each layer, each episode, revealing more of the complexity of the case, more about the character and behavior of the suspects, more about possible motives and alibis, and more potentially compromising truths. In Netflix’s Tiger King (2020), each layer […]

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The Food that Built America

This post originally appeared on the Critical Studies in Television blog. Despite the confidence of its title, History’s recent miniseries The Food That Built America (2019) seems to invite questions about its own premise. What, we might ask, does it mean to say that a particular food has built America? Do we mean “built” economically? Culturally? Politically? All of the above? […]

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Drunk History

This post originally appeared on the Critical Studies in Television blog. Incongruity, Immanuel Kant once observed, is an essential element of humor. “In everything that is to excite a lively convulsive laugh there must be something absurd (in which the understanding, therefore, can find no satisfaction). Laughter is an affectation arising from the sudden transformation of […]

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SO! Podcast #73: NYC Highline Soundwalk

This post originally appeared on SoundingOut! CLICK HERE TO DOWNLOAD:  SO! Podcast #73: NYC Highline Soundwalk SUBSCRIBE TO THE SERIES VIA ITUNES ADD OUR PODCASTS TO YOUR STITCHER FAVORITES PLAYLIST In a recent profile, New Yorkmagazine’s Justin Davidson called the NYC High Line, a “tunnel through glass towers,” an urban beautification project that had been designed with local real estate prices in mind, which […]

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Nostalgia for the Neighborhood

This post originally appeared on the Critical Studies in Television blog. “Well, we all need a little love in our lives.” So replied the actor-musician François Clemmons, who for 25 years played Officer Clemmons on Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood (Family Communications, 1968-2001), when he was asked recently why he thought it was that the new documentary about his friend Fred […]

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